India (2 of 3): The Blue City of Jodhpur

Jodhpur was beautiful and fascinating-hands down my favorite city we visited! I did my very best to narrow down my photographs but I still wound up with 150, so, yeah, good luck.

We left Delhi around 9pm Monday night, after our Taj Mahal trip, and that in itself was an experience. I booked tickets online but the only thing I had was a text message confirming them. We assumed we would go to the train station and pick up our actual tickets, like we do at the airport or Chinese train stations. We went through insane traffic and arrived at total chaos. There was basically no…anything. We tried approaching the only thing that looked like an office and the guy glanced at my text message and just sort of gestured us into the station. There were no lines, no security checks, just people everywhere, standing around, sitting on the platforms, laying on blankets, eating dinner, waiting for trains. We tried asking a few more people who looked like employees but all they really did was shrug and confirm that we left from platform 3. So we went to platform 3 about 10 minutes before the train was scheduled to leave, and just…walked on. No one checked anything. We found our sleeper bunks and got settled-they were actually pretty comfortable. The train set off and we played gin rummy for a while. Eventually a conductor came around and checked Jess’s passport against his list, ignored mine, and continued on his way. It was a definite change from what I’m used to!

We arrived in Jodhpur around 8am the next morning. I didn’t think we’d be able to check in to our Airbnb that early but we went over to see if we could just leave our backpacks. The host, Sanjay, was really accommodating though, showed us to our rooms to get cleaned up, and got us some tea and coffee while we planned out our day. We wandered around the alleys for a while taking in the sights, then in the afternoon, Sanjay arranged a tuk-tuk driver to take us to the Mandore Gardens.

The Mandore Gardens were beautiful but it was also a hard place to visit because it was packed with so many beggars, many of them children, injured or disabled. Some of them were very insistent. It’s difficult to walk by but we’ve read over and over that giving money just exacerbates the problem in the end. There’s no way of knowing where the money goes in the end, if they’re allowed to keep it; even if so, if kids make enough money on the streets there’s no incentive to go to school. So we ignored it as best we could. Our driver walked around with us pointing out some of the sights, and was a bit of a deterrent as well.

It was also hard to see so many stray dogs. There are dogs absolutely everywhere, just roaming the streets, and some of them are clearly ill or injured. Others are seemingly well-taken care of though, just allowed to roam. None of them seemed mean or anything, they were just hanging out in the streets. People seemed to look out for them as much as possible though; we’d see women leaving leftovers out by their front doors in the morning, or men whistling them over to share some extra chips or street food snacks. We also saw so many other animals-goats, pigs, lots and lots of cows…

I had read that Jodhpur had a medieval step well but had no idea where it was, so were excited to stumble onto it just down the street from our Airbnb! The structure is so intricate. It’s not as old as some, only about 300 years, but still impressive. There’s a more detailed history and some really cool pictures here: https://kevinstandagephotography.wordpress.com/2017/03/21/toorji-ka-jhalra-jodhpur-step-well/

Wednesday, Sanjay arranged for the same driver to take us sightseeing. We started at Mehrangarh Fort, which was really fascinating

Afterwards we drove a little ways down the road to the Rao Jodha Desert Rock Garden, which was beautiful and peaceful. We spent about an hour hiking and only saw one other guy on the trail the whole time we were there.

Our next stop was Jaswant Thada temple, which was lovely:

We stopped by the royal palace on our way back to the guesthouse but were pretty exhausted by that point and on a strict budget so we didn’t pay to go in, just enjoyed the grounds and relaxed in the shade with some ice cream.

Our last day we mostly spent exploring the city on foot and taking pictures. We went up to the top of the hill behind the fort where the old city is, the original blue city, and walked around for a couple hours just enjoying all the color. Blue was an indicator of the Brahmin class of priests in the Indian caste system, but now the color has spread to many buildings in Jodhpur. Most of them are concentrated in this older area though, and it’s gorgeous.

We later walked around the central town square with its famous clock tower and enjoyed the night market. There is a fantastic spice store here, actually there are several, but the best is Mohanlal Verhomal : http://mvspices.com/. I had heard about it a while ago and been looking forward to it. It’s a chef’s dream come true. The proprietress was great, very helpful, let us smell and taste and look around for a while. Everything was very good quality and price-I definitely splurged here. They also ship all over the world, so check out the link!

We spent our last night taking in the sunset from the rooftop patio of our guesthouse, Mehran View, and trying to capture an evening shot of Mehrangarh Fort behind it. I had trouble getting my camera settings to work in the dark, but our host was also a photographer so he helped me get some nice photos.

It was so hard to leave this place. I know I forgot to add a lot of things but I’m going to have to edit this later because it’s almost midnight and sadly, oh, so sadly (I could cry), I have to go back to work tomorrow morning…

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