HaLong Bay

I don’t have much to say, but I have a ton of pictures. Halong Bay has been on my travel list for years so I had to see it this trip. It was my one splurge-I booked an overnight cruise from Hanoi. They pick everyone up in a van, then it’s about a four-hour drive to Halong Bay. It rained off and on during the drive but the views were beautiful. All along the highway were fields and fields of rice, with farmers wading through them picking the plants, some still using oxen, others with tractors that had sort of metal or wood frame wheels to roll through the mud.

We got on our boat around noon and checked in to our cabins. There were 15 people total: 5 guys from India who kept mostly to themselves, a family of 4 from Australia, a father and daughter from Russia, and another dad from Belgium with his teenage son and daughter. It was an interesting group, and a fairly small boat; we saw others much larger. The main area of the bay was super crowded; the tender boats could barely find a place to dock to pick everyone up. But once we got on the boat we headed to Bai Tu Long Bay-part of the Halong Bay heritage area, but less crowded. It was raining most of the first day but the water was pretty calm; all the little islands seem to break up any waves. I liked seeing them in the rain, actually, it was misty and looked so mysterious.

The cliffs rise straight out of the sea, with no natural beaches I could see, but one of the larger islands had a man-made beach built for the tours to dock. From there, we could climb up to a large cave in the side of the rock and explore.

In the evening, we anchored to have dinner and spend the night. The food was delicious; every kind of seafood in the area-shrimp cocktail, squid, stuffed crabs, oysters, steamed fish, lots of vegetables, rice, and pumpkin soup, which seams to be popular here. They also had a cooking demonstration where everyone got to make some traditional spring rolls. After dinner, we had the opportunity to try squid fishing. Fortunately no one caught anything. It rained more overnight but the bay still stayed pretty calm and the cabins were really comfortable so I slept well.

The view of the bay at twilight was stunning!

The next morning we left bright and early and arrived at this little floating fishing village just after breakfast. The houses were built on pontoon-type platforms and linked by docks. Some were houseboats. I was surprised to see how many people had dogs or cats with them, just floating along. The cruise companies had arranged for some of the local fishermen to row tourists around the islands in rowboats to see the village and cliffs, so we anchored there and got into smaller boats. It was a beautiful morning to be out: finally got a bit of sun!

It was a bit sad to see though. Our guide was telling us how these fishermen had lived in their floating villages for generations, even had floating schools for the children. It was the only way of life they knew. But when the bay was declared a world heritage site the government wanted to clean up the bay and relocated them to the mainland. Many couldn’t read or write and couldn’t find jobs.  They still come back to fish and the government employs some to clean up trash on the bay and has subsidized other employment, like the pearl farm we visited. Still, this trip has illustrated a lot of the problems caused by overtourism. I have read several articles lately about this problem that is affecting different places around the world, but in Vietnam I have seen it first hand. Hoi An, where I am now, is overrun with tourists, and it’s clear that the lives of the local people have been changed, even in the past few years.

I arrived back in Hanoi by the late afternoon and had a bit of time for some shopping and sightseeing in the evening. The lake at night is even more beautiful:

cof

My flight the next day was scheduled at 6pm (and ended up being delayed until 8pm) so I had the morning and early afternoon to explore. I took one of the hop-on-hop-off tours buses to see as much as possible; this one let you choose the duration, which was nice, since they had a 4-hour option and I had 4 hours left in Hanoi. It rained a lot of the time but I still sat outside on the top deck with my umbrella. (I thought I was the only crazy one, till we drove past West Lake and I noticed people still swimming in the rain!) It was a good way to see some of the city outside the old quarter.

Clockwise: Hanoi Opera House, Flag Tower, Temple of Literature, West Lake Pagoda, Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum

 

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